Geoff Hudson-Searle

4 years ago · 3 min. reading time · visibility 0 ·

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What happened to Hemingway?

What happened to Hemingway?

Many years ago, I have the fortune to visit Key West with a great friend of mine who has a love for motorcycle experiences, we drove on the Harley from Miami to Key West on our latest adventure.

We decided to visit Ernest Hemingway’s House in Key West, Hemingway was an incredible man, truly a genius of his kind, who had an attitude toward living and life that was like no other, and very few have received a Nobel Prize.

https://www.ted.com/talks/andrew_solomon_how_the_worst_moments_in_our_lives_make_us_who_we_are?utm_campaign=tedspread--a&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare

My final word on the subject is that determination, resilience, and persistence are the enabler for people to push past their adversities and prevail. Overcoming adversity is one of our main challenges in life. When we resolve to confront and overcome it, we become expert at dealing with it and consequently triumph over our day-to-day struggles.

As Eckhart Tolle once said:

“Whenever something negative happens to you, there is a deep lesson concealed within it.”


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Geoff Hudson-Searle

Geoff Hudson-Searle

4 years ago #4

Thank you Robert Cormack for your kindness, have an amazing weekend!

Debasish Majumder

Debasish Majumder

4 years ago #3

lovely buzz Geoff Hudson-Searle! enjoyed read and shared. thank you for the buzz.

Larry Boyer, 🐝 Brand Ambassador

Some interesting perspectives on Hemmingway and working through adversity from Geoff Hudson-Searle

Robert Cormack

Robert Cormack

4 years ago #1

What happened to Hemingway was he lost it all. His health was declining, his ability to write was declining and his mental health was declining. Since each was tied to his lifestyle and his writing, he didn't see any alternative but to end his life. Depression was only part of it. The bigger part, the part that haunted him in his later years, was no longer doing what he enjoyed. Writing, fishing, boxing, hunting, conversing with friends, dancing (he loved to dance), all that was gone. Sadly, many writers have ended the same way. Depression is certainly part of it, but i'm sure if Hunter S. Thompson were to explain it, he'd say: "Sometimes you have to cash out."

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